Pinsky Folks in the Philippines for Bioinformatics and Genomics Workshop

Malin and Rene just came back from the Philippines where they participated in a 12-day bioinformatics and genomics workshop hosted at Silliman University. This annual workshop is part of a larger NSF-funded PIRE project investigating Centennial Genetic and Species Transformations in the Epicenter of Marine Biodiversity.

Click here to learn more!

Science Policy Forum: climate change may spark global fish conflict

Our paper in Science out today, “Preparing ocean governance for species on the move” is available here or in Spanish here.

News coverage:

Ocean currents shape the geography of life in the Coral Triangle

Coral dispersal in an oceanographic model for the western tropical Pacific

In a new paper published online today in Progress in Oceanography, Diane Thompson and collaborators (including Malin) show how ocean currents transport coral larvae throughout the western Tropical Pacific, and how the barriers posed by these currents have helped shape where species are found.

Link for free access until July 27, 2018 is here.

Thompson, D., J. Kleypas, F. Castruccio, E. Curchitser, M. L. Pinsky, B. Jönsson, and J. Watson (2018). Variability in oceanographic barriers to coral larval dispersal: do currents shape biodiversity? Progress in Oceanography 165: 110-122 doi: 10.1016/j.pocean.2018.05.007

Warming Waters Push Fish To Cooler Climes, Out Of Some Fishermen’s Reach: Paper in PLOS ONE by Jim, Becca, and Malin!

Jim, Becca, and Malin’s paper, Projecting shifts in thermal habitat for 686 species on the North American continental shelf, was published in PLOS ONE last week (and featured in their Climate Change Channel). The paper details how species’ habitat will shift to cooler waters in the face of climate change.

Researchers projected the habitat shifts under a high-emissions scenario and a low-emissions scenario.

Press coverage included

Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences and Rutgers Recreation Team up to Provide Undergrads with Scientific Diving Instruction

Rutgers-New Brunswick’s scientific diving class was created through a collaboration between the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences and Rutgers Recreation. The class is taught by Rutgers Recreation’s scuba coordinator, Debbie Miller, and leads to certification as a recreational diver, a rescue diver, and – by the American Academy of Underwater Sciences – a scientific diver. Read the full article , which gives mention to our lab’s fieldwork on clownfish larval dispersal in the Philippines, to find out more!

Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences and Rutgers Recreation Team up to Provide Undergrads with Scientific Diving Instruction

Our lab haiku

From lab meeting this week led by Jennifer Hoey, we developed a “sciku“:

Genomes and climate
Changing across land, sea, sky.
Let’s discover why!

Becca’s research on Science Friday

Becca Selden teamed up with DataSpire’s Kristin Hunter-Thomson to develop an educational resource with Science Friday’s educational director Ariel Zych. The resource teaches 7-12th grade high school students to interpret the impacts of warming oceans on marine ecosystems. Lab members Katrina Catalano, and Lisa McManus provided valuable scientific review of the resource prior to its publication.

Check it out at:

https://www.sciencefriday.com/educational-resources/interpreting-the-impacts-of-rising-ocean-temperatures-on-ecosystems/

The ocean is changing. As it changes, the ecosystem and the species within the ocean are impacted, sometimes in surprising ways. This is a story about how some of those changes—in temperature, where fish populations live, and the fishing communities that rely upon them—could play out along the Atlantic Coast in the next century. It’s also a story about making predictions and using evidence from data. Here’s how it’s going to work:

  1. Read a story from the docks of New England: What’s changing?
  2. Meet a scientist and think like one: How do we collect data on the oceans?
  3. Think like a fish: Use data to model changes in fish populations.
  4. Make predictions: Use your model to make predictions and inform the community