Notes from the field 2013: Leyte, Philippines

Punta Lauis, Bay Bay, Leyte
Punta Lauis, Bay Bay, Leyte
15 days on the ground, 35 dives, and a very productive field season to understand metapopulation dynamics in clownfish (specifically Amphiprion clarkii). This is a multi-year project using genetic parentage methods to identify parents and offspring on the reef. See here for a few photos! Thanks to the the Marine Lab at Visayas State University for hosting us.

The human face of climate change

Nature Climate Change ran a feature story on Mike Fogarty and Malin’s earlier paper in Climatic Change Letters. To quote the story: “Adaptation to climate change in fisheries is occurring very rapidly. Research now shows that it is a complex process whose outcomes can both mitigate and exacerbate impacts on fish populations.” How people respond and the coping responses they use are an important part of the story.

Study highlights how fisheries are likely to respond to climate change

Mean latitude of four fisheries in the Northeast U.S.
Mean latitude of four fisheries in the Northeast U.S.
It is increasingly clear that marine fish are shifting and will continue to shift poleward as climates warm. However, what these shifts mean for fisheries has long been less clear. In a new paper in Climatic Change, Mike Fogarty and Malin show how fisheries and the value of their landed catch are also moving poleward (see graph on right for four species in the northeast U.S.). These shifts push some species out of reach for coastal communities, but also provide new opportunities. This kind of information can inform decisions about how to adapt to climate change, but such adaptations take time and have costs. Local knowledge and equipment, for example, are geared to the species that have long been present in the area.

New insights into larval dispersal

Map of predicted population openness on Ragged Island, Bahamas.
Map of predicted population openness on Ragged Island, Bahamas.
Larvae disperse across patchy seascapes, and yet we typically assume that those seascapes are uniform. In a new paper in Ecological Applications, Malin and co-authors tease apart the consequences of this seemingly simple fact: Pinsky et al. 2012 Open and closed seascapes: Where does habitat patchiness create populations with high fractions of self-recruitment? As the title suggests, isolated habitat patches can have high self-recruitment, even without unusually short dispersal distances.

New paper on adding up the benefits we get from the ocean

Map of ecosystem services in Lemmens Inlet, BC.
Map of ecosystem services in Lemmens Inlet, BC.
Guerry et al. 2012 Modeling benefits from nature: using ecosystem services to inform coastal and marine spatial planning is now out in the International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services, and Management. The paper describes a suite of tools for calculating marine ecosystem services from a seascape and sets the stage for the rest of the Marine Natural Capital Project.