Planning Ahead Protects Fish and Fisheries: Pinsky et al. paper out in Science Advances

Effective planning for climate change helps avoid conflicts over ocean uses

[From press release by Todd Bates]

Conservation of fish and other marine life migrating from warming ocean waters will be more effective and also protect commercial fisheries if plans are made now to cope with climate change, according to a study Malin led in the journal Science Advances in collaboration with Lauren Rogers (Alaska Fisheries Science Center), former postdoc Jim Morley (now East Carolina University), and Thomas Frölicher (University of Bern).

The project focused on costs and benefits of planning ahead for the impacts of climate change on marine species distributions. We simulated the ocean planning process in the United States and Canada for conservation zones, fishing zones and wind and wave energy development zones. We then looked at nearly 12,000 different projections for where 736 species around North America will move during the rest of this century. We also looked at potential tradeoffs between meeting conservation and sustainable fishing goals now versus in 80 years.

We were worried that planning ahead would require setting aside a lot more of the ocean for conservation or for fishing, but we found that was not the case. Instead, fishing and conservation areas can be set up like hopscotch boxes so fish and other animals can shift from one box into another as they respond to climate change. We found that simple changes to ocean plans can make them much more robust to future changes. In other words, planning ahead can help society avoid conflicts.

Take home message: while climate change will severely disrupt many human activities and complete climate-proofing is impossible, proactively planning for long-term ocean change across a wide range of sectors is likely to provide substantial benefits.

Read the paper here in Science Advances.

Working Group Awarded Funding from RCN-ECS on Genomic Analysis of Evolution!

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RCN Evolution in Changing Seas Logo

A group of graduate students and post-docs led by René Clark were awarded $10,000 from the Research Coordinated Network for Evolution in Changing Seas (RCN-ECS) to start a new working group reviewing the literature on genomic analysis of past and present specimens to quantify evolution through time. The group includes members from five universities: Rutgers (René Clark, Katrina Catalano, Brendan Reid, Kyra Fitz, Malin Pinsky), Alabama (Anthony Snead), Old Dominion (Eric Garcia, John Whalen), Michigan State (Kyle Jaynes), and UC Santa Cruz (Allyson Salazar Sawkins).

The group will review the literature to understand and synthesize the effects of methodology on the ability to detect contemporary evolutionary changes across taxa and habitats. After evaluating the literature on temporal genomic methodology, the group will formulate a decision framework to help guide the design of future studies. They hope to accelerate the use of temporal genomics in understanding evolutionary response to change across systems, taxa, and time.

Quantifying dispersal variability among nearshore marine populations: Katrina Catalano et al. paper out in Molecular Ecology!

yellowtail clownfish (Amphiprion clarkii) in the field!

Ph.D. Candidate, Katrina Catalano, and several Pinsky Lab co-authors published a paper in Molecular Ecology exploring the larval dispersal of a coral reef fish, the yellowtail clownfish (Amphiprion clarkii). They processed genetic samples from these fish along 30 km of coastline consisting of 19 reef patches in seven years (2012–2018) and monsoon seasons to determine dispersal patterns. They found that the distance of dispersal of each fish subpopulation in their study varied significantly among years and seasons, but not in direction of dispersal (northward, southward, or self-recruiting). The amount of dispersal variation observed in this study is comparable to variation among species, indicating that interannual and seasonal variation likely play a significant role in determining metapopulation dynamics.

Check out the article here!

Read the Rutgers press release here!

Additional press coverage from Yahoo! News, Daily Hunt, and The Hawk

Jeewantha (virtually) attends AFS 2020!

Jeewantha Bandara, a Pinsky Lab graduate student and Fulbright Scholar, attended the virtual annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society from September 14th to the 25th. He presented a poster titled “Use of Dissolved Oxygen, Salinity and Zooplankton Concentration to Determine Black Sea Bass (Centropristis striata) Habitat in North East Atlantic”. Jeewantha sought to determine which underlying environmental variables determine the distribution of Black Sea Bass. He used a two-stage GAM to explore the predictive power of a range of environmental variables on presence/absence and abundance of Black Sea Bass. He found that a model including salinity, zooplankton, and temperature best predicted the distribution of Black Sea Bass.

Click the links below to download the poster, and poster presentation video!

Welcoming Three New Lab Members!

The Pinsky Lab is pleased to welcome two new graduate students, Jaelyn Bos & Kyra Fitz, and a new Post-doc, Brendan Reid.

Kyra is joining the lab as a 1st year Ph.D. student in the Ecology and Evolution program. She has a B.S. in Marine Biology from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She has studied the impacts of environmental change on a variety of species including corals, elephant seals, sea lions, sea turtles, and larval fish. Her research interests include population genomics, marine conservation biology, and spatial ecology. In her free time she enjoys playing tennis, swimming, cooking, and taking her dog, Lucy, to parks.

Jaelyn is also joining the lab as a Ph.D. student in the Ecology and Evolution program. She is from Maryland, and graduated from University of Maryland, Baltimore County in 2017 with bachelors’ degrees in environmental science and biology. From 2017 to 2019, she served with the Peace Corps in Mozambique, teaching high school biology. She’s interested in coral reefs, conservation, and ecosystem resilience, particularly in East Africa. She also enjoys hiking, running, and hanging out with friends and family (from a distance).

Brendan grew up in New Jersey and is happy to be back working for the Garden State! He received his Masters from Columbia University and his PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and post-PhD he has worked at the American Museum of Natural History and at Michigan State’s Kellogg Biological Station. He is interested in gene flow and the demographics of species and communities, and his past work has used genetics to understand these processes in a wide variety of taxa (crustaceans, sloths, marine and freshwater turtles, and fish). Brendan currently lives with his girlfriend and two cats in New York City and he enjoys hiking, reading, and music.

Characterizing uncertainty in climate impact projections: Morley et al. paper out in ICES JoMS

Ensemble mean projections across 18 Earth system models and 6 niche models for the RCP 8.5 scenario for Pacific halibut (a, b), Pacific ocean perch (c, d), summer flounder (e, f), and American lobster (g, h). For each species, the left panel shows projected suitable habitat for the initial time period of 2007–2020, and the intensity of the blue represents habitat suitability while grey represents areas of the projection grid that are not suitable. The right panels show projected change in habitat suitability between the 2081–2100 time period and 2007–2020. For the right panels, red represents a decline in habitat suitability, blue represents increases in habitat suitability, and grey represents areas of no change; increasing intensity of blue (red) represents a proportionally greater increase (decrease) in habitat suitability.

Former Pinsky Lab Post-doc, Dr. Jim Morley, collaborator, Dr. Thomas Fro¨licher, and Dr. Malin Pinsky assessed and quantified the uncertainty in climate impact projections in their new paper out in ICES Journal of Marine Science. Using a case study approach, the team conducted 8964 unique projections for shifts in suitable habitat of seven important marine species occurring on the North American continental shelf, including American Lobster, Pacific Halibut, Pacific Ocean Perch, and Summer Flounder. They found that projection uncertainty arose from Earth system models (ESMs), and the niche modelling approach used to represent species distributions for all species, but variation associated with the parameter values in niche models was insignificant. Greenhouse gas emissions scenario contributed to uncertainty for projections at the century scale. The characteristics of projection uncertainty differed among species and also varied spatially, which underscores the need for improved multi-model approaches with a suite of ESMs and niche models forming the basis for uncertainty around projected impacts. Ensemble projections show the potential for major shifts in future distributions. Therefore, rigorous future projections are important for informing climate adaptation efforts.

Read the full article here.

Jennifer Hoey defends her PhD!

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Dr. Jennifer Hoey successfully defended her PhD dissertation, “Adaptation and evolutionary potential in light of anthropogenic stressors in the ocean” on May 11th, 2020! It was by videoconference, with audience members calling in from literally all over the world. Jennifer’s research on evolutionary patterns in summer flounder has already been published in two papers, Hoey et al. 2018 Evolutionary Applications and Hoey et al. 2020 Molecular Ecology, with a third on the way. Jennifer has also done incredible science outreach work as part of the Science Partnership Committee within the National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI). She has become a vital part of not only our lab, but the entire Rutgers Ecology & Evolution community through her work with the graduate program, outdoor activities, dining, art and more. She will be sorely missed as she moves on to a postdoc at UC Santa Cruz. The biggest congratulations and thank you to Jennifer on behalf of the entire Pinsky lab and DEENR!

Using multiple natural tags provides evidence for extensive larval dispersal across space and through time in summer flounder: Hoey et al. paper out in Molecular Ecology!

Jennifer Hoey, a Pinsky Lab PhD candidate, and a team of collaborators published a paper exploring larval flounder dispersal last week in Molecular Ecology. They used both SNP genotypes and otolith core microchemistry from 411 archived summer flounder (Paralichthys dentatus) samples collected between 1989 and 2012 at five locations along the U.S. east coast to reconstruct dispersal patterns over time. While neither genotypes nor otolith microchemistry alone were sufficient to identify the source of larval fish, they used otolith microchemistry to identify clusters of larvae that originated in the same location, which allowed them to make genetic assignments of clusters with more confidence. They found that most larvae likely originated near Cape Hatteras, a biogeographic break, and that larvae were transported both north and south of the break. Larval sources did not move north over time, despite the northward shift of adult populations over the same time period. Their novel, multi-tag approach, demonstrates that summer flounder dispersal is widespread throughout their range, on both intra‐ and inter‐generational timescales, and may be a particularly important process for synchronizing population dynamics and maintaining genetic diversity during an era of rapid environmental change. Broadly, their results reveal the value of archived collections and of combining multiple natural tags to understand the magnitude and directionality of dispersal in species with extensive gene flow.